KARLHEINZ STOCKHAUSEN

Stockhausen CD's

Instrumentation Works for Orchestra

Stockhausen Complete Edition on CD

Since 1991, a complete edition of all recordings in which Karlheinz Stockhausen has personally participated is being released on compact discs. Each CD in this series is identified by Stockhausen's signature followed by an encircled number. The numbers indicate the general historical order of the works.
Stockhausen realised the electronic music and participated in these recordings as conductor, performer, sound projectionist, and musical director. He personally mixed down the recordings, mastered them for CDs, wrote the texts and drew the covers.

  • The compact discs may be obtained from the Stockhausen-Verlag: Kettenberg 15, 51515 Kuerten, Germany (www.stockhausenCDs.com).

Karlheinz Stockhausen
Instrumentation Works for Orchestra
LUCIFER'S DANCE

Instrumentation for wind orchestra (symphony band) or symphony orchestra

LUCIFER'S DANCE can be performed by a wind or symphony orchestra.
The same score is used for both alternatives. Special instructions in the score, notated in , mark the version for symphony orchestra.
There are separate sets of orchestra parts for the two versions.

Instrumentation for wind orchestra

Soloists
1 bass (or trombone or euphonium), amplified by transmitter
    (Staged performances are always with bass voice.)
1 piccolo trumpet in B-flat, amplified by transmitter
1 piccolo flute, amplified by transmitter

Wind Orchestra (ca. 80 musicians), ( ) = ossia

Gruppe Part    
1 1 A 1 percussionist  
1 1 B 3 (4) flutes  
1 1 C 3 (4) flutes (ossia alto flutes)  
1 1 D 3 basset-horns (ossia E-flat alto clarinets)  
2 2 A 1 percussionist  
2 2 B 3 clarinets  
2 2 C 3 clarinets  
2 2 D 3 bass clarinets  
3 3 A 1 percussionist  
3 3 B 2 soprano saxophones (possibly sopraninos for high F)  
3 3 C 2 alto saxophones  
3 3 D 1 tenor saxophone  
3 3 E 1 baritone saxophone  
3 3 F 1 bass saxophone (ossia contrabass clarinet or tuba)  
4 4 A 1 percussionist  
4 4 B 2 (4) oboes  
4 4 C 2 (4) English horns  
4 4 D 2 (4) bassoons  
4 4 E 1 (2) contrabassoon(s) (ossia contrabass clar. or tuba)  
5 5 A 1 percussionist  
5 5 B 3 trumpets
mutes
H W M Spitz C
(see Notation)
5 5 C 3 trumpets
5 5 D 3 trombones
   (3rd possibly bass trombone)
6 6 A 1 percussionist  
6 6 B 3 trumpets
mutes
H W Spitz F C
(see Notation)
6 6 C 3 trumpets
6 6 D 3 trombones
   (3rd possibly bass trombone)
7 7 1 percussionist  
8 8 A 1 percussionist  
8 8 B 2 horns I    1-2  
8 8 C 2 horns I    3-4  
8 8 D 2 horns II    1-2  
8 8 E 2 horns II    3-4  
9 9 A 1 percussionist  
9 9 B 2 euphoniums I  
9 9 C 2 euphoniums II  
10 10 A 1 percussionist  
10 10 B 2 alto trombones (ossia flugelhorns)  
10 10 C 2 baritones (American) = tenor horns (German)  
10 10 D 4 bass tubas  

See the Seating plan for concert performances with wind orchestra.

Depending on the instrumentation of the wind orchestra (symphony band), all instrumental groups except the percussion may be enlarged or reduced proportionately for concert performances.
Groups 1 (possibly also 2 ) and 4 should be amplified with, for example,
3 (+3) + 4 microphones, so that they sound as loud as the others.
The prescribed movements for each group must be synchronous and as large as possible. All musicians should sit facing the public, so that the polyrhythm of the movements is clearly visible.
When ordering the performance material for wind orchestra, the instrumentation and number of parts required should be specified. There are special parts available for alto flutes (1 C); for E-flat alto clarinets instead of basset-horns (1 D); for contrabass clarinet or tuba instead of bass saxophone (3 F); for the contrabass clarinet instead of contra bassoon (4 E); for flugelhorns instead of alto trombones (10 B).

Instrumentation for symphony orchestra (only for concert performances)

Soloists

1 bass (or trombone or euphonium), amplified by transmitter

1 piccolo trumpet in B-flat, amplified by transmitter
1 piccolo flute, amplified by transmitter

Symphony Orchestra (ca. 59 musicians), ( ) = ossia

Group Part            
1 1 A 1 percussionist          
1 1 B 2 (3) flutes  
4 (6) flutists





4(5) clarinets 


     
1 1 C 2 (3) flutes (ossia alto flutes)        
1 1 D 1 basset-horn        
2 2 A 1 percussionist        
2 2 B 1 clarinet        
2 2 C 1 (2) clarinet(s)        
2 2 D 1 bass clarinet        
3 3 A 1 percussionist          
3 3 B 6 violins          
3 3 C 4 violas          
3 3 D 2 violoncelli I          
3 3 E 2 violoncelli II          
3 3 F 2 double-basses          
4 4 A 1 percussionist          
4 4 B 2 oboes  
4 oboists


3 (4) bassoonists
     
4 4 C 2 English horns        
4 4 D 2 bassoons        
4 4 E 1 (2) contrabassoon(s)        
5 5 A 1 percussionist          
5 5 B 2 trumpets
mutes as in
wind orchestra
     



5 trumpeters



5 5 C 1 trumpet    
5 5 D 2 trombones  


4 trombonists


6 6 A 1 percussionist      
6 6 B 1 trumpet
mutes as in
wind orchestra
   
6 6 C 1 trumpet    
6 6 D 2 trombones      
7 7 1 percussionist          
8 8 A 1 percussionist          
8 8 B 1 horn I   1  


4 horn players


     
8 8 C 1 horn I   2        
8 8 D 1 horn II   1        
8 8 E 1 horn II   2        
9 9 A 1 percussionist          
9 9 B euphonium I  
(ossia synthesizer)
     
9 9 C 1 euphonium II        
10 10 A 1 percussionist          
10 10 B/C 1 synthesizer
   (plays the alto trombone and baritone parts)
         
10 10 D 2 bass tubas (possibly played by synthesizer 10 B/C)          

See the Seating plan for symphony orchestra

All musicians — including the strings - should sit facing into the hall
(and not turned 90°).

A symphony orchestra may omit the prescribed movements.

With the exception of the 7th percussion part, the percussion parts are quite easy and can be played by percussion students or by non-percussionists (for instance string players).
When ordering the orchestra parts for a performance with symphony orchestra, the instrumentation and number of parts required should be specified.
There is a special part available for synthesizer 9 B/C instead of 2 euphoniums.
Synthesizer 10 B /C can also take over the parts of the bass tubas (10 D) (already included in part 10 B/C).

Percussion

Each of the 10 percussionists has 1 antique cymbal:

beater with heavy round plastic head

  Percussionist 1  
1 keisu (kettle bell)
(also called Dobaći or Ching- Tsching)

with special beater ca. 40 cm
 
  Percussionist 2  
1 glockenspiel  
  Percussionist 3  
2 alarm bells (tocsins)
(cast bronze bells)
ca. 23    27,5 cm
weight    ca.6    10 kg
with original clapper, played from the inside
 
  Percussionist 4  
3 rin
(Japanese temple instrument:

brass-coloured metal cups on coloured cushions)     ca.12,5    13,5    15,5 cm
wooden beater and sometimes heavier beaters with round plastic heads
 
  Percussionist 5  
2 tubular bells    
  Percussionist 6  
2 Javanese gongs
(also called Khwang-Wong or Thai Gamelon:

gold-coloured bronze bossed gongs, hung)
 
  Percussionist 7 (soloistic)  
1 high-hat
notation
 
  = strike open high-hat and let sound  
  = simultaneously strike with stick and briefly depress foot pedal, let sound  
  = strike with stick and depress pedal, then roll while gradually releasing the high-hat with the pedal  
2 cymbals    main pitches  
2 Thai gongs (nipple or bossed gongs)  
1 Chinese opera gong "fu-in luo"    
Every beat produces a glissando
which ends on d :
 
1 plate bell (bronze)
or sound plate (duraluminium)
 
1 snare drum, with snare on  
  Tuning when struck near the rim:  
  The pitches within the tritone C-F
are approximate: F
The C should be exact, and
the range interval depends
on the instrument.
 
  The snare drum should be muted to such an extent that it no longer dominates.  
1 tom-tom    
1 bass drum with pedal    
  = rim shot on snare drum and tom-tom  
  = let sound  
    =  immediately after the stroke, hold beater straight up, high above the head, and stay in this position until the next stroke: depending on the instrument struck, right or left or both beaters.  

For the solo starting at bar 613 and its recurrence, beaters must be chosen which sound as good for the gongs and sound plate as for the drums (possibly beaters with different types of head on the two ends).

  Percussionist 8  
1 vibraphone bar (mounted on a resonator box)  
2 cinelli
(also called Ching-ba:

heavy small cymbal "from Peking" ) 17 cm   18,5 cm

played with glockenspiel beaters
 
  Percussionist 9  
1 antique cymbal ("crotal")

(special cast for the low pitch,
mounted on a resonator box)
 
2 tam-tams Chau-Luo
(cast bronze)

with Sato tam-tam beaters 70 cm    90 cm
and tubular bell hammer with leather
 
  Percussionist 10  
1 bowl bell (cast bronze)

(bronze support on bottom,
stands on small woooden table) ca. 35 cm
keisu beater, or similar
 
1 tam-tam Chau-Luo
(cast bronze)

with Sato tam-tam beater    ca. 80 cm
and tubular bell hammer
 

These pitches should be based on A = 442 Hz.

Every percussion instrument must be muted at the end of a notated
duration (even grace notes) unless a (resonance marking) or
"klingen lassen" ("let sound") is explicitly notated.

Set-Up for Percussionist 7
(as seen by the player)

This set-up may also be reversed.

All instruments of percussionist 7 should sound equally loud, therefore:
mute the snare drum and play it softer; use a relatively thick stick for the side where the tom-tom, gong and sound plate are located, and wrap linen tape around its middle (for striking gong and sound plate); generally strike the high-hat and gong harder.
The high-hat must be larger than usual.
The point at which the gong is struck should be constantly varied.
The rim shots on the tom-tom should be varied in timbre by varying the distance between the hand and hitting point of the stick (for instance for
, reduce distance). They should sound more like wood than skin.

It is possible for the unusual percussion instruments for LUCIFER'S DANCE to be loaned from the Stockhausen-Verlag.

MICHAEL'S GREETING LIGHTS – WATERS